Demand for H1-B Skilled-Worker Visas Forces Agency Into Lottery – WSJ

U.S. demand for foreign skilled-worker visas surpassed the entire year’s mandated supply within five days, prompting the government to say it will award them through a lottery. Source: Demand for H1-B Skilled-Worker Visas Forces Agency Into Lottery – WSJ I wrote… To paraphrase, “It’s the flood of certification, and paucity of education, stupid.”  In other […]

Evidence That Schools That Educate Graduate Students Who Are in Big Demand

Uber…put up a billboard outside Carnegie Mellon’s computer-sciences building that said: “We are looking for the best software engineers in Pittsburgh.” Graduate students are being approached to work at the company. Source: Carnegie Mellon Reels After Uber Lures Away Researchers – WSJ This is a story about one of the top schools in computer science […]

NY Times Column on Value of a Liberal Education

Starving for Wisdom – NYTimes.com I also recommend this fine article or the short version. When I was a Freshman at Carnegie Tech (Now Carnegie-Mellon), we had to take a course in composition, followed by a course in literature.  I don’t remember everything we read in the composition course, but here is the best I can […]

Rip Van Skillsgap on Paul Krugman’s Blog Is Wrong

Rip Van Skillsgap – NYTimes.com. “Please, Prof. Krugman, you are too important a voice not to pay attention to data that screams that there is a gigantic gap between what you think is an education, and what “customers” (once quaintly known as “students”) are actually getting – even in many so-called “elite” schools. There is […]

Mistaken Acceptance Letters Could Be Avoided

Johns Hopkins Mistaken Acceptance Letters: Part of a Long Tradition. I found this, after I saw the news that Carnegie Mellon had mistakenly sent acceptance letters for the CS M.S. program. I talked to an expert (who didn’t want to be identified).  That expert told me that “It isn’t a matter of money.  It doesn’t […]

Colleges’ Use of Adjunct Instructors Comes Under Pressure – WSJ

Colleges’ Use of Adjunct Instructors Comes Under Pressure – WSJ. I commented. “What matters is not whether a university uses adjuncts;  what matters is how a university sees its students and what goals the administrators have for themselves.   If the university sees students as naïve consumers; and the administrators’ goals are self-aggrandizement (from rankings and money), then the university will fit David Riesman’s  description,   […]

Buildings? How to Truly Build A Great Univeristy

This is from Richard Cyert’s  1973 inaugural address as President of Carnegie Mellon University.  He served until 1990.  He certainly helped build a great university. “…Some people associate a quality education with fine, new buildings.  Yet every new building increases the operating budget…and the university may end up with fewer funds for its  educational…budget…it is far better […]

Focus on Administrative Attitudes: Carnegie Mellon Contrasted With Washington Univ. in St. Louis

I received a comment from someone who taught at Carnegie in the 90’s.  I will compare it – only with respect to administrative attitudes –  to my experience at Washington Univ. in St. Louis.  I believe that, though both of these observations are somewhat anecdotal, there is enough substance (and observation) in both cases to illuminate these serious and important […]

Grade Inflation Pays But So Does Rolling Back the Odometer – Or Overrating a Bond

But, eventually, the piper gets paid.  Unearned grades means unlearned material. I just read the following article, Correspondence Bias in Performance Evaluation: Why Grade Inflation Works by Don A. Moore, Samuel A. Swift, Zachariah S. Sharek and Francesca Gino of Carnegie Mellon University.  http://www.cbdr.cmu.edu/papers/pdfs/cdr_608.pdf. After hypothesizing (and later demonstrating) that graduate schools don’t pay attention to any particular […]