Example of How First Graders Are Learning to Think Mathematically

a strategy for first graders learning addition. If you want to remember what 8+5 is, you recall that 8 needs two more to be 10; take those two away from the 5 and give them to the 8, leaving you with 10+3 = 13 Source: Meet the New Common Core – The New York Times […]

Added Copy of the “Purloined Proof”

In “The Purloined Proof” I told the story of…well, a purloined proof.  I did not include the actual proof, though.  I have now added it, though I have not said who did the “purloining”.  The interested reader may be able to find out for themselves.  Certainly, mathematicians should be able to if they want to […]

Alexander Grothendieck Dies

Alexander Grothendieck, Math Enigma, Dies at 86 – NYTimes.com. Here is an excerpt from his letter to the Swedish Royal Academy rejecting the 1988  $250,000 Crafoord Prize. “…the ethical standards of the sciences ( certainly in mathematics) have been degraded to such an extent that the most bare-faced plagiarism between colleagues ( often at the […]

Blatant plagiarism sinks paper (and earns a sabbatical!) for mathematician From “Retraction Watch”

Blatant plagiarism sinks paper (and earns a sabbatical!) for mathematician | Retraction Watch. This is timely since I’m in the process of writing about “paper rustling“. I will make one comment about the story from Retraction Watch. The case described there is petty only in the sense that it doesn’t make or break big careers.  […]

“Why Do Americans Stink at Math?” (From NY Times Mag.) My View – The 800 Pound Gorilla

This is an excellent article.  (Why Do Americans Stink at Math? – NYTimes.com.) Most articles that I read about school reform don’t address the fact that our higher education system must be reformed first. (I have explained my view in the category “University Education Dumbs Down High School”.) To read the part of the article that addresses the […]

Math – Tougher Than You Think (But Then So Is Spelling)

First, the math. My wife was watching a local TV station after a bad storm.  The reporter in the field showed the reporter at the station some of the big tree branches that had fallen.  The reporter at the station asked, “Can you give us an idea of the diameter of some of the larger branches?”  The reporter in the […]

Gina Kolata’s New York Times Article Gives Helpful Insight for Flawed Cholesterol Calculator

Gina Kolata wrote again today about the cholesterol calculator that exaggerates “…the true risk of a heart attack or stroke by an average of 100 percent…” http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/19/health/flawed-gauge-for-cholesterol-risk-poses-a-new-challenge-for-cardiologists.html?ref=us This article gives more insight into the statistical/mathematical problems:  “…Dr. H. Gilbert Welch, a medical professor at Dartmouth [says] the calculator, like many others used in medicine, is […]

More on The Atlantic’s Article on Teaching Math

(The article is here http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2013/11/the-stereotypes-about-math-that-hold-americans-back/281303/#disqus_thread ) There were some interesting replies to my comment on the article.  I am posting my response to this one because it might be informative for some readers of this blog.  It states my view, and probably the view of many others, of two of the problems facing professors now.  The […]

Manil Suri (Mathematician and Author) Publishes Op-Ed Describing Interesting Ideas From Mathematics

This post is just to bring reader’s attention to Prof. Suri’s nice piece in the NY Times.  Here is the link: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/16/opinion/how-to-fall-in-love-with-math.html?ref=opinion&_r=0